migration-denmark

Migration In Denmark

 Denmark

 

The Green card scheme

It is possible to be granted a residence permit for the purpose of seeking work and working in Denmark. A residence and work permit under the Green card scheme is issued on the basis of an individual evaluation based on a point system.

If you are granted a residence permit under the Green card scheme, you do not need to obtain a separate work permit. A residence permit under the Green card scheme gives you the right to carry out paid or unpaid work. However, a residence permit under the Green card scheme does not give you the right to work as a self-employed person (run your own business).

Important information before you apply

Job opportunities

The points in the Green card scheme are given on the basis of objective criteria used to assess whether applicants are generally suited to apply for highly qualified jobs in Denmark. Getting a residence permit under the Green card scheme is not the same at getting a job. It is entirely your own responsibility to find a job in Denmark so you can support yourself.

At present, the demand for foreign labor is generally limited. However, certain sectors request highly qualified foreign professionals. Please note that good Danish language skills are often a condition for success in the Danish work market.

Before applying for a residence permit under the Green card scheme you should assess your job opportunities. There are several web portals, databases and CV banks which can be useful in the process of seeking work in Denmark.

 

Authorization

Please note that if you wish to work within certain fields and have a foreign education, you must obtain an authorization or similar official approval from the relevant authority.

Doctors and dentists can apply for a special residence permit in order to obtain an authorization.

denmark

If you are granted a residence permit under the Green card scheme

Please note that within six months of getting your permit, you must move to Denmark and have an official address in Denmark. It is your own responsibility to find a place to live. Furthermore, within the first year of getting your permit, you must have earned a minimum of DKK 50,000 in Denmark.

Also note that you cannot bring any accompanying family members to Denmark before you are settled at an official address in Denmark, have found a job, and have received a salary. Read more about this requirement below.

 

If your application is turned down

We are often contacted by applicants who wish to have their fee refunded after their application has been turned down because they failed to obtain 100 points. The fee is a case processing fee intended to cover the cost of processing the case.

Consequently, the fee will not be refunded if your application is processed – regardless of whether you are granted a residence permit, or your application is turned down, because you do not meet the requirements. Likewise, the fee will not be refunded if you withdraw your application.

 

Conditions

In order to be granted a residence permit under the green card scheme, you must obtain a minimum of 100 points. Points are given for:

  • Educational level
  • Language skills
  • Adaptability

 

You must document that you are able to support yourself during your first year in Denmark.

If you are granted a residence permit, you must take out a full health insurance covering you and any accompanying family members until you are covered by the Danish National Health Insurance.

If you are granted a residence permit, it is also a requirement that in the first year you have earned a minimum of DKK 50,000 in Denmark. The Danish Agency for Labor Market and Recruitment will automatically check the Danish income register to see if you meet this requirement. If not, your residence permit may be revoked.

Furthermore, it is a requirement that you do not receive any union support for new graduates (if you have completed an educational programme in Denmark) or any public assistance under the terms of the Active Social Policy Act (lov Om aktiv socialpolitik) during your stay in Denmark.

You cannot be granted a new residence permit under the Greencard scheme if, in the past five years, you have resided in Denmark on a residence permit under the Greencard scheme.

 

Points for Educational level

 

You can only get points for the Danish educational level which your education equals.

 

The reason is that the level of academic degrees may vary from country to country, even if they have the same title. For example, at master’s degree from another country may not be of the same level as a Danish masters (candidates) degree.

The Danish Agency for Labor Market and Recruitment will decide whether it is necessary to have your educational level assessed by the Danish Agency for Higher Education, the authority which assesses foreign qualifications.

The Danish Agency for Higher Education has developed a database designed to assess foreign qualifications and match them with the Danish equivalent.

In order to receive any points for your educational level, you must, as a minimum, have the equivalent of a Danish Bachelor’s degree. You will only be given points for your highest educational level, and only for completed educational programmes. Points are given as follows:

 

  • Bachelor’s degree/Graduated from medium-length education: 30 points
  • Bachelor’s degree followed by one-year Master’s degree: 50 points
  • Master’s degree: 60 points
  • PhD: 80 points

You will be given 30 bonus points if your education qualifies you to work in a field where Denmark is currently experiencing a shortage of qualified professionals. You can find these fields on the Positive List. In order to obtain the bonus points, your education must be directly linked to a job title on the Positive List. Furthermore, you must meet the requirements for the job title in question, e.g. a Professional Bachelor’s degree or a Danish authorization.

 

See the Positive List

You will be given bonus points if you graduated from a university which is internationally recognized for its high academic level according to the latest THES-QS World Ranking. Points are given as follows:

  • Top 400: 10 points
  • Top 200: 15 points
  • Top 100: 20 points

You can be given a maximum of 130 points for your educational level.

 

Language skills

In order to be given points for language skills, you must document that you have passed a recognized exam in either Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English or German. Only language test which you passed less than two years prior to the the time you apply will be considered.

With regards to Danish, Swedish and Norwegian, you must have passed Danish Language Test, Level 1, 2 or 3 (Prøve i Dansk 1, 2 eller 3) or the Study Test in Danish as a Second Language (Studieprøven) or the Swedish or Norwegian equivalent:

  • Prøve i Dansk 1 (or Swedish/Norwegian equivalent): 5 points
  • Prøve i Dansk 2 (or Swedish/Norwegian equivalent): 10 points
  • Prøve i Dansk 3 (or Swedish/Norwegian equivalent): 20 points
  • Studieprøven (or Swedish/Norwegian equivalent): 40 points

 

With regards to English or German, your must have passed an English or German language test equivalent to Danish Language Test, Level 3 (Prøve i Dansk 3) or the Study Test in Danish as a Second Language (Studieprøven):

  • English/German test equivalent to Prøve i Dansk 3: 20 points
  • English/German test equivalent to Studieprøven: 40 points

 

You can only receive points for one Scandinavian language and for either English or German. Consequently, you can receive points for both Swedish and English, or both Danish and German, but not for both Danish and Norwegian, or for both English and German.

You can be given a maximum of 40 points for your language skills.

You will only be given points for approved exams. Other exams do not qualify for points.

 

Points for adaptability

You can be given points for your educational or work related attachment to the EU/EEA (including Denmark) or Switzerland, as this is seen to increase your ability to quickly adapt to the Danish Labour market. Points are given for either education or work. Points are given as follows:

Completion of at least one year’s study at a higher educational programme in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland: 5 points

Completion of at least three years’ study at a higher educational programme in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland: 10 points

Or

At least one full year’s (12 consecutive months’) legal residence and work in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland: 5 points

At least two consecutive year’s legal residence and work in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland: 10 points

You will be given 5 bonus points for Danish language skills (passed exam in Danish Language Test, Level 2 (Prøve i Dansk 2) or higher).

You can be given a maximum of 15 points for adaptability.

 

Duration

You can be granted a first-time residence permit under the Greencard scheme for up to two years. Before the end of this period, you can apply for an extension of up to three years.

Your residence permit can be extended if you meet a minimum income requirement: If, in the course of the past 12 months before submitting your application for an extension, you have earned the average salary (of the public and private sector) for new graduates with a Bachelor’s degree. In 2015, the required amount is DKK 319,725. (This amount may change without any prior notice)

You must have earned this salary on ordinary terms, your salary must have been reported to the Danish tax administration (SKAT), and your employer must be established in Denmark. Public subsidies and support, sick pay and similar will not be included when calculating your pay.

You can submit your application for an extension no sooner than 3 months before your residence permit expires. It is crucial that you submit your application for an extension before your current residence permit expires.

If you submit your application after the date your residence permit expires, you should expect your application to be rejected. This means that if will not be processed unless special conditions apply, such as, if you cannot be blamed for the delay, or if Denmark’s international oblications warrant it. If your application for an extension is rejected, you will have to leave Denmark and apply for a new residence permit in your country of origin. Such an application will be regarded and processed as an entirely new application for a residence permit, i.e. it will be processed in accordance with the rules that apply to first-time applicants, and you will lose the right to an extension of your previous residence permit.

If your residence permit expires, and you applied for an extension before the expiration date, you may stay in Denmark with the same right while your application is being processed.

 

 

Transitional scheme

The Greencard scheme has been changed as per 1 January 2015.

A special transitional scheme applies, if you were granted a residence permit under the Greencard scheme before 1 January 2015. As a result, the first application for an extension which you submit after 1 January 2015 will be processed under the previous extension rules. However, any subsequent applications for an extension will be processed under the new extension rules, where you must meet the income requirement. It is stated in your latest residence permit letter which requirements you must meet.

 

Examples of extension situations

Example 1: The applicant was granted a permit on 4 September 2014 with the expiration date being 4 September 2016. The applicant applies for an extension in August 2016 and must meet the previous extension rules, as this is the applicant’s first application for an extension after 1 January 2015. Consequently, the requirement is having worked for a minimum of ten hours per week for the past 12 months. The applicant is granted a one-year extension on 10 November 2016, which will expire on 10 November 2017. When the applicant applies for an extension in 2017, the present requirements must be met.

Example 2: The applicant has submitted a first-time application on 21 December 2014 and is granted a permit on 15 January 2015, which will expire on 15 January 2018. The applicant applies for an extension in January 2018 and must meet the new extension requirements, that is, the income requirement. The reason is that the applicant was granted an application after 1 January 2015.

Example 3: The applicant has submitted a first-time application on 5 January 2015 and is granted a permit on 1 April 2015, which will expire on 1 April 2017. The applicant applies for an extension in February 2017 and must meet the new extension requirements, that is, the income requirement.

 

Greencard scheme for students at higher educational programmes

There is a special version of the Greencard scheme for students. This scheme enables foreign students who complete a higher educational programme in Denmark to stay in Denmark after graduating in order to look for work.

You can be granted a residence permit in order to follow a higher educational programme in Denmark.

 

Conditions

In order to be granted a residence permit you must document:

 

  • that you have been admitted to a higher educational programme which has been approved by a state authority or which is offered by a publicly accredited educational institution
  • that you can speak and understand the language of instruction and have a working knowledge of either Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English or German
  • That you can support yourself with your own means for the duration of your stay in Denmark. You must document that you have at your disposal an amount equivalent to Danish student grants (SU) for the period of time your residence permit is to cover, with 12 months being the maximum requirement. The monthly amount is DKK 5,903, making the maximum required amount 12 x 5,903 = DKK 70,839
  • If you are to pay a tuition fee yourself, you can document that you have paid the tuition fee for the first semester, instead of documenting that you can support yourself. Please note that as a foreign student in Denmark, you may not receive public assistance / benefit payments. If you do so, your residence permit can be revoked.

 

 

The Positive List – overview

 

Below follows an overview of all job titles on the Positive List as per 1 January 2015, divided into professional fields. The required education should be in a relevant area.

 

Engineer

 

Mechanical engineer

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

Production engineer

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

Building engineer

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

Environmental engineer

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

Energy engineer

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

Electrical engineer

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

IT engineer

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

Doctor, dentist and veterinarian

 

Medical consultant

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Medical doctor

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Hospital doctor

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Consultant doctor/chief physician

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Health, healthcare and personal care

 

Surgical nurse

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Anesthetic nurse

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Nurse

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Health visitor

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Radiologist

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Medical laboratory technologist

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree + Danish authorization

 

IT and tele communication

 

IT architect

Requirement: At least three years’ IT education

 

Programmer and systems developer

Requirement: At least three years’ IT education

 

IT consultant

Requirement: At least three years’ IT education

 

 

Teaching in high schools, seminaries, folk high schools etc.

 

Upper secondary school teacher, natural science and physical education

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Upper secondary school teacher, humanities and creative subjects

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Teaching in elementary schools

Primary and lower secondary school teacher

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree + Danish authorization

 

 

Educational work

 

Pedagogue

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

Social pedagogue

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

 

Other academic work

 

Land surveyor

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Pharmacist

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Auditor

Requirement: Master’s degree

 

Business controller

Requirement: At least three years’ education at university level or business school level

 

Financial controller

Requirement: At least three years’ education at university level or business school level

 

Economics and business administrator

Requirement: At least three years’ education at university level or business school level

 

Business analyst

Requirement: At least three years’ education at university level or business school level

 

Attorney

Requirement: Master’s degree + Danish authorization

 

Legal counselor

Requirement: Master’s degree

 

Economist

Requirement: Master’s degree

 

Building and construction

 

Architectural technologist and construction manager

Requirement: Professional Bachelor’s degree

  • FAQ for Denmark Green Card Sachem
  • Q.1. Who can come to Denmark?

    Foreign nationals cannot easily enter or reside in Denmark. The conditions to reside in Denmark depend, i.e. on your nationality. Nordic citizens are free to enter, reside, study and work in Denmark. EU/EEA citizens are free to enter Denmark and reside in a short period. You can also stay here for a longer period if i.e. you work or study in Denmark.

    Citizens from other countries cannot reside in Denmark without a residence permit on the grounds on work, study, family reunification or asylum.

    If you wish to visit Denmark for a short period certain nationalities have to apply for a visa.

  • Q.2. Can former Danish Citizens have a residence permit in Denmark?

    Yes, people who are former Danish citizens can obtain a residence permit in Denmark.

  • Q.3. How long will it take to process my application?

    We have received a large amount of applications under the Green card scheme. This means that the normal 30 day service goal for maximum processing time has been temporarily suspended. If it is necessary to have your educational level assessed by the Danish Agency for Universities and Internationalizations, you will be notified.

  • Q.4.Where can I submit my application?

    tic mission (embassy or consulate general) in your country of origin (or the country where you have resided legally for the past three months). The mission will then forward your application to Danish Agency for Labour Retention and International Recruitment, where it will be processed.

    If there is no Danish diplomatic mission in your country of origin (or country of residence), it is often possible to submit your application at the mission of another Schengen country.

    If you are residing legally in Denmark (e.g. based on another residence permit, procedural stay, visa, or visa-free stay), you can normally submit your application in Denmark. You can submit your application at the Service Centre. If you live outside Greater Copenhagen, you can also submit your application at the local police who will then forward it to the Danish Agency for Labour Retention and International Recruitment

     

  • Q.5. How many points can I obtain for my education?

    The Immigration Service cannot tell you in advance how many points you will be given. If the Immigration Service is unable to assess your educational level, they will ask the Danish Agency for International Education to assess it. You should be able to get a general impression of the points you can obtain on the page describing the point system.

    In order to receive any points for your educational level, you must, as a minimum, have the equivalent of a Danish Bachelor’s degree. You will only be given points for your highest educational level, and only for completed educational programmes. Points are given as follows:

     

    • Bachelor’s degree/Graduated from medium-length education: 30 points
    • Bachelor’s degree followed by one-year Master’s degree: 50 points
    • Master’s degree: 60 points
    • PhD: 80 points

    You will be given 30 bonus points if your education qualifies you to work in a field where Denmark is currently experiencing a shortage of qualified professionals. You can find these fields on the Positive List. In order to obtain the bonus points, your education must be directly linked to a job title on the Positive List. Furthermore, you must meet the requirements for the job title in question, e.g. a Professional Bachelor’s degree or a Danish authorization.

    See the Positive List

    You will be given bonus points if you graduated from a university which is internationally recognized for its high academic level according to the latest THES-QS World Ranking. Points are given as follows:

    • Top 400: 10 points
    • Top 200: 15 points
    • Top 100: 20 points

    You can be given a maximum of 130 points for your educational level.

  • Q.6. Must I submit a letter of confirmation from my university?

    In your application you must include an official statement from your university which clearly states which educational degree you have achieved, and during which period you achieved it.

  • Q.7. How long is my residence and work permit valid?

    You can be granted a first-time residence permit under the Green card scheme for up to 3 years. Before the end of this period, you can apply for an extension of up to 1 year. Before the end of this period, you can apply for an extension of up to four years.

  • Q.8.What is a case category?

    A case category is an application type which may require the applicant to pay a fee. This includes for example applications of residence permits for interns or applications for a permanent residence permit

  • Q.9.Why are fees now being charged for applications for Danish residence permits?

    The Danish parliament has decided that a fee will be charged to process applications for residence for educational and business purposes.

     

  • Q.10.How was the amount of the fee determined?

    The amount of the fee is based on how much time is required to process an application. For example, the fee for an application for green card are higher than the fee charged for a student residence permit because it takes more time and resources to process an application for green card.

  • Q.11.Is it possible to find out in advance – before I pay and apply – whether I will receive a permit?

    It is not possible to be told in advance whether you would qualify for a residence permit. Employees at the Danish Immigration Service’s Citizen Service or at the Danish Agency for Labour Retention and International Recruitment’s Citizen Centre can, however, help you find the correct application form, and once it is completed they will review it together with you. The employees can also give you general information about the rules governing residence permits.

    A decision on your application will be made by the appropriate office, and will only be made once you have submitted the application and all the required documents.

  • Q.12.What is the case order system?

    The case order system is used to generate a case order ID and serves as the entrance to the payment module. The case order system can be accessed from the fee section.

  • Q.13.Case types which do not warrant a fee?

    There is no fee for submitting an application for a residence permit in the following case types:

    Family reunification, asylum, residence permit on humanitarian grounds, residence permit as a non-deportable person, accompanying family member of a religious worker.

    Likewise, there is no fee for submitting an application for an extension of one of these case types or for a permanent residence permit, or when submitting an appeal or a request for a case to be re-opened in one of these case types.

  • Q.14.What is a case order?

    When you submit a case order you request a unique number (case order ID) that will link your payment to your application. Submitting a case order is not the same as submitting an application.

    You must indicate your case order ID at the time of payment as well as on your application.

  • Q.15.What is a case order ID?

    A case order ID is a unique number that is used to link your application and your payment. Case order IDs can be created by using the case order system. The ID number is made up of two letters followed by four numbers and two more letters. For example: DD-8726-UI.

    You must indicate your case order ID at the time of payment as well as on your application.

  • Q.16.How do I create a case order ID?

    You can create a case order ID by using the case order system on newtodenmark.dk. A case order ID will be created after you enter the required personal data. If you have problems creating your case order ID, please contact the Immigration Service to have one created for you.

    You must indicate your case order ID at the time of payment as well as on your application.

     

  • Q.16.What do I enter in the ‘information about the applicant’ section in the case order system if I do not have a passport number?

    If you do not have a passport number, leave the field blank. You do not need to fill out this field in order to create a case order ID.

  • Q.17.What do I enter in the ‘information about the applicant’ section in the case order system if I only have one name?

    If you only have one name, fill in your name in either of the name fields. In the other field write “n/a”.