migration-can

Migration Canada

Canada

 

Skilled Migration Visa

The Federal Skilled Worker visa is designed for individuals who have the qualifications, skills or experiences to fill Canada’s skill shortages and contribute to the Canadian economy.

 

Applicants to the Federal Skilled Worker visa must demonstrate that they meet the minimum visa requirements including having work experience in a high skilled occupation, and either have a Canadian job offer or be a graduate of a Canadian PHD program. In addition, applicants must meet the pass mark on a points-based assessment. Successful applicants will obtain Canadian permanent residence, which will entitle them to live and work in Canada with few restrictions. Canadian permanent residents may also be eligible for Canadian citizenship.

canada

Federal Skilled Worker Visa Basic Requirements

 

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) has set specific basic requirements that all applicants must meet in order to apply for a Federal Skilled Worker visa.

 

To qualify for skilled migration, applicants must be able to satisfy the basic visa requirements related to an applicant’s health and character.

 

In addition to meeting the basic visa requirements, applicants must also pass a points-based assessment. Points can be claimed in areas related to an applicant’s age, English or French language ability, work experience, qualifications and ability to adapt to life in Canada. The current pass mark for the Federal Skilled Worker visa is 67 points.

 

Federal Skilled Worker Visa Entitlements

 

Successful applicants and holders of a Canadian Federal Skilled Worker visa become permanent residents of Canada. Permanent resident are entitled to live, work and study in Canada on a permanent basis.

 

Additional benefits of Canadian permanent residences includes access to government-subsidized education and healthcare, as well as unrestricted access to Canada’s labor market and associated insurance and pension benefits. Permanent residents also have the ability to apply for Canadian citizenship and the opportunity to sponsor family members to join them in Canada.

 

 

To qualify for permanent residence under the new FSW program, applicants must meet the following essential conditions:

  • Possess at least one-year, within the previous 10 years, of work experience in one of the eligible occupations or the equivalent in part-time continuous employment; AND
  • The work experience must be classified within Skill Type 0 (Managerial Occupations), Skill Level A (Professional Occupations), or Skill Level B (Technical Occupations and Skilled Trades) within the meaning of the National Occupational Classification (NOC) system; AND
  • Applicant must meet minimum language level in one of Canada’s two official languages;
  • Score sufficient points under the skilled worker point grid comprising of six selection factors. The current pass mark is 67 points; AND
  • Possess suitable settlement funding; AND
  • Undergo a successful security background and medical examination.

Under the new rules, qualified applicants are evaluated against six factors to determine their eligibility for immigration to Canada. Applicants must obtain a total of 67 points out of a possible 100 in order to qualify. The selection factors are:

Factor Max Points
EDUCATION Max. 25
(Canadian equivalence established by a designated third party)
Doctorate 25
Master’s or professional degree 23
Two or more post-secondary degrees, of which one is three years or longer 22
A three year or longer post-secondary degree 21
A two-year post-secondary diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship 19
A one-year post-secondary diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship 15
Secondary School Educational Credential 5

 

 

LANGUAGE (Abilities: Speak, Read, Write, Listen) Max. 28
1st Lang Very high proficiency (per ability) (CLB 9) 6
High proficiency (per ability) (CLB 8) 5
Intermediate proficiency (per ability) (CLB 7)**Minimum threshold required to apply 4
Basic or no proficiency 0
Possible maximum (all four abilities) 24
2nd Lang Basic proficiency or higher (per ability) 1
No proficiency 0
Possible maximum (all four abilities) 4

 

EXPERIENCE (NOC Skill Level O,A,B) Max. 15
One year**Minimum threshold required to apply 9
Two to three years 11
Four to five years 13
Six years or more 15

 

AGE Max. 12
18 to 35 years 12
36 years 11
Less one point per year until 47 years

 

ARRANGED EMPLOYMENT IN CANADA Max. 10
HRSDC-confirmed permanent offer of employment 10
Applicants from within Canada holding a temporary work permit that is:
·         Validated by HRSDC, including sectorial confirmations 10
·         Exempt from HRSDC validation under international agreements (e.g., NAFTA) 10

 

ADAPTABILITY Max. 10
Applicant has a minimum of 1 year skilled Work experience in Canada 10
Applicant has previously studied in Canada 5
Relatives in Canada 5
Arranged employment 5
Spouse (Study/work in Canada) 5
Spouse (IELTS 4.0/4.5/3.5/4.0) 5

 

If you would like to determine whether you are eligible under FSW program please email your CV at info@nhpeducationconsultants.com or click on the Free Assessment Button and complete the questionnaire to receive a free assessment.

work-in-canada

Provincial Nominee Programs

PNP – Immigration Options

 

Most provinces in Canada have an agreement with the Government of Canada that allows them to nominate immigrants who wish to settle in that province. If you choose to immigrate to Canada as a provincial nominee, you must first apply to the province where you wish to settle and complete its provincial nomination process. The province will consider your application based on its immigration needs and your genuine intention to settle there.

 

Here is a list of the provinces and territories currently participating in this program, however, the criteria vary among the provinces.

 

  1. Alberta
  2. Manitoba – Newfoundland and Labrador
  3. Ontario
  4. Saskatchewan
  5. British Columbia
  6. New Brunswick
  7. Nova Scotia
  8. Prince Edward Island
  9. Yukon
  10. Northwest Territories

 

After you have been nominated by a province or territory, you have to make a separate application to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) for permanent residence. A CIC officer will then assess your application based on Canadian immigration regulations.

 

  • You will have to pass a medical examination and security and criminal checks.
  • You must also show that you have enough money to support yourself and your dependents after you arrive in Canada.
  • Provincial nominees are not assessed on the six selection factors of the Federal Skilled Workers Program.

 

 

 

The eligible occupations include many widely practiced professions.

  1. Senior managers – financial, communications and other business services (NOC

0013)

  1. Senior managers – trade, broadcasting and other services, i.e. (0015)
  2. Financial managers (0111)
  3. Human resources managers (0112)
  4. Purchasing managers (0113)
  5. Insurance, real estate and financial brokerage managers (0121)
  6. Managers in health care (0311)
  7. Construction managers (0711)
  8. Home building and renovation managers (0712)
  9. Managers in natural resources production and fishing (0811)
  10. Manufacturing managers (0911)
  11. Financial auditors and accountants (1111)
  12. Financial and investment analysts (1112)
  13. Securities agents, investment dealers and brokers (1113)
  14. Other financial officers (1114)
  15. Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations (1123)
  16. Supervisors, finance and insurance office workers (1212)
  17. Property administrators (1224)
  18. Geoscientists and oceanographers (2113)
  19. Civil engineers (2131)
  20. Mechanical engineers (2132)
  21. Electrical and electronics engineers (2133)
  22. Petroleum engineers (2145)
  23. Information systems analysts and consultants (2171)
  24. Database analysts and data administrators (2172)
  25. Software engineers and designers (2173)
  26. Computer programmers and interactive media developers (2174)
  27. Mechanical engineering technologists and technicians (2232)
  28. Construction estimators (2234)
  29. Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians (2241)
  30. Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics (2243)
  31. Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety

(2263)

  1. Computer network technicians (2281)
  2. Nursing coordinators and supervisors (3011)
  3. Registered nurses and registered psychiatric nurses (3012)
  4. Specialist physicians (3111)
  5. General practitioners and family physicians (3112)
  6. Dietitians and nutritionists (3132)
  7. Audiologists and speech-language pathologists (3141)
  8. Physiotherapists (3142)
  9. Occupational therapists (3143)
  10. Respiratory therapists, clinical percussionists and cardiopulmonary technologists

(3214)

  1. Medical radiation technologists (3215)
  2. Medical sonographers (3216)
  3. Licensed practical nurses (3233)
  4. Paramedical occupations (3234)
  5. University professors and lecturers (4011)
  6. Psychologists (4151)
  7. Early childhood educators and assistants (4214)
  8. Translators, terminologists and interpreters (5125)

 

Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) Criteria

Summary of points per factor for Express Entry candidates

 

  1. Core / human capital factors
Factors Points per factor – With a spouse or common-law partner Points per factor – Without a spouse or common-law partner
Age 100 110
Level of education 140 150
Official languages proficiency 150 160
Canadian work experience 70 80

 

 

  1. Spouse or common-law partner factors
Factors Points per factor(Maximum 40 points)
Level of education 10
Official language proficiency 20
Canadian Work Experience 10

 

 

  1. Skill Transferability factors (Maximum 100 points)
Education Points per factor(Maximum 50 points)
With good/strong official languages proficiency and a post-secondary degree 50
With Canadian work experience and a post-secondary degree 50

 

Foreign work experience Points per factor(Maximum 50 points)
With good/strong official languages proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark [CLB] level 7 or higher) and foreign work experience 50
With Canadian work experience and foreign work experience 50

 

Certificate of qualification (for people in trade occupations) Points per factor(Maximum 50 points)
With good/strong official languages proficiency and a certificate of qualification 50

 

  1. Core/human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner + C. Transferability factors = Maximum 600 points

 

  1. Additional points (Maximum 600 points)
Factor Points per factor
Arranged employment (positive Labour Market Impact Assessment required) 600
600

 

  1. Core/human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner factors + C. Transferability factors + D. Additional points = Grand total – Maximum 1,200 points

 

Points breakdown, section by section

CRS – A. Core / human capital factors

  • With a spouse or common-law partner: Maximum 460 points total for all factors.
  • Without a spouse or common-law partner: Maximum 500 points total for all factors.

 

Age With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 100 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 110 points)
17 years of age or less 0 0
18 years of age 90 99
19 years of age 95 105
20 to 29 years of age 100 110
30 years of age 95 105
31 years of age 90 99
32 years of age 85 94
33 years of age 80 88
34 years of age 75 83
35 years of age 70 77
36 years of age 65 72
37 years of age 60 66
38 years of age 55 61
39 years of age 50 55
40 years of age 45 50
41 years of age 35 39
42 years of age 25 28
43 years of age 15 17
44 years of age 5 6
45 years of age or more 0 0

 

Level of Education With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 140 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 150 points)
Less than secondary school (high school) 0 0
Secondary diploma (high school graduation) 28 30
One-year degree, diploma or certificate from  a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 84 90
Two-year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 91 98
Bachelor’s degree OR  a three or more year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 112 120
Two or more certificates, diplomas, or degrees. One must be for a program of three or more years 119 128
Master’s degree, OR professional degree needed to practice in a licensed profession (For “professional degree,” the degree program must have been in: medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, optometry, law, chiropractic medicine, or pharmacy.) 126 135
Doctoral level university degree (Ph.D.) 140 150

 

 

Official languages proficiency – first official language

Maximum points for each ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening):

  • 32 with a spouse or common-law partner
  • 34 without a spouse or common-law partner

 

Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 128 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 136 points)
Less than CLB 4 0 0
CLB 4 or 5 6 6
CLB 6 8 9
CLB 7 16 17
CLB 8 22 23
CLB 9 29 31
CLB 10 or more 32 34

 

 

Official languages proficiency – second official language

Maximum points for each ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening):

  • 6 with a spouse or common-law partner (up to a combined maximum of 22 points)
  • 6 without a spouse or common-law partner (up to a combined maximum of 24 points)
Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 22 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 24 points)
CLB 4 or less 0 0
CLB 5 or 6 1 1
CLB 7 or 8 3 3
CLB 9 or more 6 6

 

Canadian work experience With a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 70 points) Without a spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 80 points)
None or less than a year 0 0
1 year 35 40
2 years 46 53
3 years 56 64
4 years 63 72
5 years or more 70 80

 

 

Subtotal: A. Core / human capital factors

  • With a spouse or common-law partner – Maximum 460 points
  • Without a spouse or common-law partner – Maximum 500 points

 

CRS – B. Spouse or common-law partner factors (if applicable)

Spouse’s or common-law partner’s level of education With spouse or common-law partner(Maximum 10 points) Without spouse or common-law partner(Does not apply)
Less than secondary school (high school) 0 n/a
Secondary school (high school graduation) 2 n/a
One-year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 6 n/a
Two-year program at a university, college, trade or technical in school, or other institute 7 n/a
Bachelor’s degree OR  a three or more year program at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute 8 n/a
Two or more certificates, diplomas, or degrees. One must be for a program of three or more years 9 n/a
Master’s degree, or professional degree needed to practice in a licensed profession (For “professional degree”, the degree program must have been in: medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, optometry, law, chiropractic medicine, or pharmacy.) 10 n/a
Doctoral level university degree (PhD) 10 n/a

 

 

Note: (N/A) means that this factor does not apply in this case.

 

Spouse’s or common-law partner’s official languages proficiency – first official language

Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level per ability (reading, writing, speaking and listening ) Maximum 20 points for sectionMaximum 5 points per ability Without spouse or common-law partner(Does not apply)
CLB 4 or less 0 n/a
CLB 5 or 6 1 n/a
CLB 7 or 8 3 n/a
CLB 9 or more 5 n/a

 

Note: (N/A) means that this factor does not apply in this case.

Spouse’s Canadian work experience Maximum 10 points Without spouse or common-law partner(Does not apply)
None or less than a year 0 n/a
1 year 5 n/a
2 years 7 n/a
3 years 8 n/a
4 years 9 n/a
5 years or more 10 n/a

 

Note: (N/A) means that this factor does not apply in this case.

Subtotal: A. Core / human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner factors = Maximum 500 points

 

CRS – C. Skill transferability factors (Maximum 100 points for this section)

Education

With good official language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark Level [CLB] 7 or higher) and a post-secondary degree Points for CLB 7 or more on all first official language abilities, with one or more under CLB 9(Maximum 25 points) Points for CLB 9 or more on all four first official language abilities(Maximum 50 points)
Secondary school (high school) credential or less (CLB levels 1 & 2) 0 0
Post-secondary program credential of one year or longer (CLB levels 3,4 & 5) 13 25
Two or more post-secondary program credentials AND at least one of these credentials was issued on completion of a post-secondary program of three years or longer (CLB levels 6,7 & 8) 25 50

 

With Canadian work experience and a post-secondary degree Points for education + 1 year of Canadian work experience(Maximum 25 points) Points for education + 2 years or more of Canadian work experience(Maximum 50 points)
Secondary school (high school) credential or less (CLB levels 1 & 2) 0 0
Post-secondary program credential of one year or longer (CLB levels 3,4 & 5) 13 25
Two or more post-secondary program credentials AND at least one of these credentials was issued on completion of a post-secondary program of three years or longer (CLB levels 6,7 & 8) 25 50

 

Foreign work experience – With good official language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark Level [CLB] 7 or higher)

Years of experience Points for foreign work experience + CLB 7 or more on all first official language abilities, one or more under 9(Maximum 25 points) Points for foreign work experience + CLB 9 or more on all four first official language abilities(Maximum 50 points)
No foreign work experience 0 0
1 or 2 years of foreign work experience 13 25
3 years or more of foreign work experience 25 50

 

Foreign work experience – With Canadian work experience

Years of experience Points for foreign work experience + 1 year of Canadian work experience(Maximum 25 points) Points for foreign work experience + 2 years or more of Canadian work experience(Maximum 50 points)
No foreign work experience 0 0
1 or 2 years of foreign work experience 13 25
3 years or more of foreign work experience 25 50

 

 

 

Certificate of qualification (trade occupations) – With good official language proficiency (Canadian Language Benchmark Level [CLB] 5 or higher) Points for certificate of qualification + CLB 5 or more on all first official language abilities, one or more under 7(Maximum 25 points) Points for certificate of qualification + CLB 7 or more on all four first official language abilities(Maximum 50 points)
With a certificate of qualification 25 50

 

Subtotal: A. Core / human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner + C. Skill transferability factors – Maximum 600 points

Additional points Maximum 600 points
Arranged employment (positive Labour Market Impact Assessment required) 600
Provincial or territorial nomination 600

 

 

Grand total: A. Core / human capital + B. Spouse or common-law partner + C. Skill transferability factors + D. Additional points = Maximum 1,200 points

 

 

  • 1.FAQ for Skilled Workers
  • 1. How to start the immigration process?

    First you must decide to immigrate. Then you must complete the preliminary questionnaire that you can find on our site, answering all of the questions, and not forgetting to put down your address, which, unfortunately, happens rather often. Within 1 - 2 days we will do a preliminary assessment of your chances to immigrate to Canada and will give you an answer.

  • 2. What documents are necessary to begin the work on immigration process?

    Among the documents that are necessary to start work on immigration file there must be copies of birth certificates, educational certificates and diplomas, marriage and divorce certificates, passports, police certificates, employment reference letter and some other certificates. The applicant receives a more complete list of necessary documents after the preliminary assessment of his immigration application. Certification of the copies and their translations is not necessary because this is included in the lawyer's fees.

  • 3. How long does it usually take to process a file?

    The processing of the file usually takes from a year to two years.

  • 4. Where is it better to pass an interview?

    The interview can be passed in any embassy of Canada. We have an individual approach to each file, and always give reasons for our recommendations to the clients.

  • 5. What is Permanent Resident Visa?

    It's a document that allows its beneficiary to live and work anywhere in Canada, this document also confirms the status of the permanent resident of Canada. Permanent Resident Visa allows its beneficiary to have the same rights (except for voting) and responsibilities as Canadian citizens. Permanent Resident can lose the status of the permanent resident if he is absent from Canada for a longer period of time than allowed by the law or commits a crime.

  • 6. Which member of the family should apply as the principal applicant?

    The principal applicant should be that member of the family whose application can get the most points. This decision plays the decisive role, because whether the principal applicant is approved or refused, the result automatically affects the entire family. The family means a husband, a wife, and their under-aged or dependent children.

  • 7. Which family members can be included in the application for permanent residence?

    They are the spouse and children under 22. The family members whom you included in your application must pass medical examination and have no criminal record. Other family members, for example, such as parents, cannot be included in your application, but you can sponsor them after you come to Canada and have worked in the country for no less than a year.

  • 8. Can I extend my immigrant visa?

    No, this visa cannot be extended. If you couldn't arrive in Canada before the time shown on you Permanent Resident Visa, then you will have to start the whole immigration process from the very beginning.

  • 9. How does an employment visa differ from an immigrant visa?

    Employment authorization allows its possessor to live and work in Canada for a certain period of time; it also limits the possessor's ability to work in Canada. Employment visa doesn't give the right for the permanent immigrant visa. As for the Permanent Resident Visa, it gives its possessor the right to work and live in any place in Canada, have the privileges of a Canadian citizen, receive Canadian citizenship after three years, and sponsor close relatives to come Canada if you have an appropriate income.

  • 10. Can one apply for both visas simultaneously?

    Yes, you can do that. However your application for employment visa can suffer, since you have the intentions to remain in Canada after it is expired. Therefore it is better to first apply for employment visa, and only after that for the Permanent Resident Visa.

  • 11. Can I get a visitor visa, if I'd already applied for a Permanent Resident Visa?

    The decision of issuing you a visitor visa for temporary stay in Canada will be affected not by the application for permanent residence, but by the definite answer to the question, what is the possibility that you will stay in Canada after the expiry of your visitor visa.

  • 12. After the family receive Permanent Resident Visas can only one family member come to Canada at first and the other afterwards?

    In each Permanent Resident Visa there is a date of its validity, you must enter Canada before the expiry of this date. As a rule it is a year after the medical examination. The immigration law allows that first the principal applicant can enter Canada and the rest of the family can come later but certainly before the expiry date on the Permanent Resident Visa.

  • 13. What minimal sum of money must I have before arriving to Canada?

    The independent immigrant should have $10 000 Canadian for the principal applicant plus $2000 for each additional family member who will live in Canada. These expenses are necessary for living and adjustment of the family in Canada during the first 6 months of the family in the country.

  • 14. When will I be able to become a Canadian citizen?

    You will be able to become a Canadian citizen after you have lived in the country for 3 years.

  • 15. Can I have dual citizenship?

    Yes, you can, if the country from which you immigrate, recognizes it. Canada recognizes dual citizenship.

  • 16. How is the immigration process affected by acquiring property in Canada?

    Until you become a Permanent Resident, buying property in Canada gives you no advantages; it does not help your immigration process. Furthermore, if you decide to come to Canada on a visitor visa after you have bought the property, immigration officials will have more reason to refuse you. As for the entrepreneurs who already live in Canada, putting their money into real estate won't help them to remove the conditions, which exist for this class of immigrants, as the authorities don't consider this as an active business.

  • 17. How realistic is it to come to Canada as a refugee?

    The refugee category includes people who are persecuted be-cause of their race, religion, nationality, belonging to a certain social group, or political opinion. Also, their own country won't or can't assist them. The general rule is this: the greater the democracy, the fewer are the refugees. Nonetheless, my firm also helps people, who make refugee claims. We can proudly remark that the percentage of our winning cases on refugee status is much higher than average.

  • 18. Is it possible to qualify as a skilled Worker with less than 75 points?

    Yes, the Canadian Government has empowered Visa Officers to use positive discretion to pass an applicant when the Visa Officer believes that the total points awarded do not properly reflect the applicant’s ability to establish in Canada from an economic perspective. Conversely, a Visa Officer has the discretion to refuse an applicant with more than 75 points.

  • 19. Can my relative in Canada apply on my behalf?

    The application to the embassy or a visa post located outside of Canada must be submitted under your name. Nevertheless, a close relative who lives in Canada can give extra points to your application.

  • 20. Must I attend an interview?

    It is at the discretion of an immigration officer who processes your application to decide whether you need an interview or not. You may need to attend an interview at which an immigration officer will access your education, knowledge of your profession, and work experience, your ability to speak, read, write and comprehend the English or / and the French language. Some skilled worker applications can be approved or refused without an interview. Business immigrants are usually required to attend an interview.

  • 21. Must I visit Canada before applying for immigration?

    It is not necessary for the applicants applying under skilled worker class to visit Canada prior to submitting the application to the embassy. Nevertheless, we always advise the potential business immigrants to visit Canada prior establishing or buying business there or making an investment to Canadian economy.

  • 22. Who must the principal applicant – my spouse or myself?

    Each of you can be the principal applicant – it depends on which of you gets more points.

  • 23: What supporting documents must I submit?

    A: Supporting documentation generally encompasses evidence of employment, education, assets, civil status, and an absence of criminal convictions. Each visa office has its own specific requirements for supporting documentation. It is advisable to seek expert guidance or get instructions from the particular visa office which will process your application.

  • 24. Am I required to have a certain amount of assets?

    A: Skilled Worker applicants will generally be required to prove that they have CAD$10,000, plus CAD$2,000 per accompanying dependent. They are expected to be able to support the landed family (the principal applicant and all accompanying dependents) until employment is obtained.

  • 25. Will my application benefit if I have a close relative in Canada?

    A: Skilled Worker applicants will be awarded bonus points if the close relative is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident and over the age of 19 years. The applicant is then referred to as an "assisted relative". To qualify as a close relative, the Canadian citizen or permanent resident must be the applicant's uncle, aunt, brother, sister, parent, nephew or niece.

  • 26. Is work experience a requirement?

    A: Work experience is a critical requirement for a Skilled Worker immigrant. Applicants must be able to demonstrate at least one year's work experience in an occupation appearing on the General Occupations List. Work experience should be accumulated after the completion of a formal education or apprenticeship in the field of occupation, or in a related field of occupation. Applicants destined to the Province of Quebec need only demonstrate several months of relevant work experience. Applicants with arranged employment in Canada are exempt from the work experience requirement.

  • 27. Must the experience have been accumulated on a full-time basis? Must it have been accumulated continuously?

    A: Part-time work experience is acceptable. It is assessed in proportion to a standard full-time working week. For example, a two-year part-time position requiring approximately 20 hours of work each week, will be counted as one year of full-time experience. Non-consecutive work experience in positions involving the same duties may also be counted, if the total work experience meets the minimum experience requirements.

  • 28. How is experience in a previous or current occupation evaluated when that occupation differs from the applicant's intended occupation in Canada?

    A:Under the "transferability of experience" rules, experience gained in another profession counts toward the assessment of experience in the intended occupation in Canada, only if the duties performed in the former profession are consistent with those associated with the intended occupation.

  • 29. Is credit given for experience gained during post-secondary studies?

    A: Experience gained as part of post-graduate studies may be credited towards the occupational experience if:

    1. a) The experience has been consistent with the National Occupational Classification

    (NOC) definition of the intended occupation; and

    1. b) The experience has been gained while pursuing studies at an educational level which surpasses the NOC eligibility requirements for the particular intended occupation.

    Teaching occupations do not appear on the General Occupations List, so teaching experience, even at a post-graduate level, is not credited. The assessment of experience gained as part of post-graduate studies is highly discretionary, and should therefore be presented in a manner strictly consistent with NOC requirements.

  • 30.Must I have a Canadian offer of employment to qualify as a Skilled Worker?

    A: You are not required to obtain an offer of an employment to qualify as a Skilled Worker.

     

  • 31. Can I apply if I do not yet have the required minimum work experience?

    A: Applicants without one year of work experience in an "open" occupation (6 months for applicants destined to Quebec or Manitoba) are required to demonstrate arranged employment.

  • 2.Express Entry FAQ: Candidates
  • 1. What is Express Entry?

    Express Entry is a new electronic management application system for immigration to Canada. It is not a new immigration program. Rather, it facilitates the selection and processing of Canada’s economic immigration programs: the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, the Canadian Experience Class, and a portion of the Provincial Nomination Programs. Applicants make an ‘expression of interest’ in immigrating to Canada and, if they are eligible for at least one of the aforementioned programs, they then enter the Express Entry pool. The federal government and provincial governments, as well as Canadian employers, are then able to select candidates from this pool who will then receive an ‘invitation to apply’ for immigration to Canada under one of the programs. Express Entry moves Canada from a first come, first served (or supply-driven) system to an invitation to apply (or demand-driven) system. Modeled on similar systems in use in Australia and New Zealand, Express Entry aims to fast track the processing of skilled immigrants deemed most likely to succeed in Canada.

  • 2. Why is it called Express Entry?

    Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) aims to process applications within six months from the date of submission, hence the name Express Entry. Note that this does not mean six months from the date a candidate made an expression of interest in immigrating to Canada, but rather six months from the date he or she submits a complete application for permanent residence after an invitation to apply has been issued.

  • 3. When did Express Entry come into operation?

    Express Entry came into operation on January 1, 2015.

  • 4. Which immigration programs are covered under the Express Entry system?

    The Express Entry system applies to the following Canadian economic immigration programs:

    Federal Skilled Worker Program

    Federal Skilled Trades Program

    Canadian Experience Class

    Provinces and territories are also able to recruit candidates from the Express Entry system for a portion of the Provincial Nomination Programs in order to meet local labour market needs

  • 5. Does Express Entry change the requirements of Canadian immigration programs?

    No. Express Entry does not change Canadian immigration program requirement. Express Entry is not a new program. Rather, it is a new management and selection system for existing immigration programs.

  • 6. What is an Express Entry profile?

    Potential candidates make an expression of interest in coming to Canada by creating an Express Entry profile and providing information about their skills, work experience, language ability, education and other personal information. This profile is self-declared; that is to say that the material provided by the potential candidate is based on his or her own assessment of his or her personal information.

  • 7. What is the Express Entry pool?

    Potential candidates who create an Express Entry profile and are eligible for one of Canada’s economic immigration programs enter the Express Entry pool. These programs are: •          the Federal Skilled Worker Program, •      the Federal Skilled Trades Program, •           the Canadian Experience Class, and •           a portion of the Provincial Nominee Programs. The federal government and provincial governments, as well as Canadian employers, are able to select candidates from this pool. Candidates who are selected then receive an ‘invitation to apply’ for immigration to Canada under one of the programs.

  • 8. Is there a cap on the number of candidates admitted to the Express Entry pool?

    No.

  • 9. What is the Comprehensive Ranking System?

    The Comprehensive Ranking System is the government of Canada’s internal mechanism for ranking candidates bases on their human capital, determined by factors such as age, level of education and language ability. This helps to enable Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) to decide which candidates may be issued invitations to apply for permanent residence. There are up to 600 points available under the system for a candidate's core human capital and skills transferability factors. An additional 600 points will be given to anyone with a confirmed job offer (i.e. having received a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment) in a skilled occupation, or a provincial nomination.

  • 10. What is the Canada Job Bank, and what role does it have under Express Entry?

    The Canada Job Bank is an online search engine for open job positions across Canada. It helps match candidates with Canadian employers and jobs based on their skills, knowledge and experience. Under Express Entry, candidates need to register with Job Bank if they do not already have a Canadian job offer or a Provincial/Territorial nomination. If a candidate is currently working in Canada on a Labour Market Impact Assessment-based work permit, he or she will not have to reapply for a new LMIA, insofar as the LMIA is still valid. Should the Express Entry candidate choose to apply to a job opportunity, the recipient employer will then be required to go through their usual interview or assessment process? If the employer finds that the Express Entry candidate meets their needs, and they are eligible to hire a foreign national, they can offer them a job. Employers with a positive LMIA will then provide this information along with a job offer letter to the candidate to include in their Express Entry profile. This is so they can more quickly be offered an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence in the next eligible draw.

  • 11. Once a candidate is in the pool, can he or she change the information on his or her profile?

    Candidates are required to update their profile to reflect any changes in their status, such as in language ability, family composition, work experience, or education credentials.

  • 12. What does ‘invitation to apply’ mean?

    An ‘invitation to apply’ is offered to any candidate in the Express Entry pool who has been selected to apply for immigration to Canada by the federal government, a Canadian province or territory, or a Canadian employer. An ‘invitation to apply’ is offered if a candidate: •         is among the top ranked in the Express Entry pool based on his or her skills, education and experience. •     is nominated by a province or territory; or • has a valid job offer from a Canadian employer (subject to the Labour Market Impact Assessment in place at that time).

  • 13. Does a candidate with more points have a better chance of being invited to apply for permanent residence than a candidate with fewer points, even though both candidates are eligible to enter the Express Entry pool?

    Whereas previously potential candidates who were eligible for a Canadian immigration program could apply directly to that program, that is no longer the case. Under Express Entry, candidates with higher point’s totals in the Express Entry pool may have a better chance of being invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence by either the federal government, a Canadian province or territory, or a Canadian employer. Highly educated candidates with skilled work experience and strong language skills in English and/or French obtain a greater number of points than those who do not possess these qualities.

  • 14. Does a candidate with an application currently in process for immigration to Canada under one of the economic immigration programs need to re-apply once Express Entry comes into operation?

    No. If a candidate is eligible for a Canadian economic immigration program, such as the Federal Skilled Worker Program, in its current format and submits an application before December 31, 2014, his or her application will be processed without the candidate being required to create an Express Entry profile.

  • 15. Is the federal government able to select candidates from the Express Entry pool?

    Yes, the federal government of Canada is able to select candidates from the Express Entry pool. These candidates do not need to have a valid job offer from a Canadian employer in order to receive an invitation to apply for permanent residence.

  • 16. Are there any eligible occupation lists for any of the programs under Express Entry?

    No, there will not be any eligible occupation lists for any of the programs. Under previous versions of the Federal Skilled Worker Program, there were lists of eligible occupations deemed in demand by the government of Canada. Under the most recent version of the Canadian Experience Class, there was a list of ineligible occupations. These lists are no more. It must be noted, however, that in order to be eligible for any of the programs under Express Entry, the candidate needs to have an occupation that has a National Occupation Classification (NOC) code of skill type 0, A or B.

  • 17. How do provinces and territories use the Express Entry system?

    All provinces and territories, except for Quebec and Nunavut, use Express Entry. Provinces and territories are able to nominate a certain number of candidates through the Express Entry system to meet their local and provincial labour market needs. If an applicant gets a nomination from a province or territory, he or she is then given enough additional points within the Comprehensive Ranking System that will lead to an invitation to apply for permanent residence at the next eligible draw of candidates. All candidates must meet the eligibility criteria of one of the federal economic immigration programs in order to enter and be selected from the Express Entry pool.

    Just as they manage their own Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) now, provinces and territories will set the criteria they use to nominate Express Entry candidates. Express Entry candidates may either enter the pool first and then be nominated by a province or territory, or be nominated by a province or territory and then complete an online Express Entry profile. Provinces and territories are also able to make nominations under their regular (“base”) PNPs outside Express Entry via a paper application process.

  • 18. Can candidates use both a Provincial Nominee Program and Express Entry?

    Yes. There are two ways to do this:

    • Apply to the PNP first, get a nomination and then fill out an Express Entry profile; or
    • Fill out the Express Entry profile first. Provinces and territories can then search the Express Entry pool and ask a candidate to apply for his or her provincial nomination. When the candidate gets a nomination certificate, he or she will update their Express Entry profile.

    In either case, once a person updates his or her Express Entry profile to show that he or she has a provincial or territorial nomination certificate, he or she will be given enough additional points to be invited to apply at the next eligible draw of candidates.

  • 19. Does a candidate need a job offer in order to immigrate to Canada under Express Entry?

    Not necessarily, though the fact that Canadian employers play a greater role in Canadian immigration under Express Entry than they did previously means that, for many candidates, obtaining a valid job offer from a Canadian employer significantly increases their chances of being invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence. Candidates in the Express Entry pool have the opportunity to increase their chances of being invited to apply by promoting themselves directly to employers through the Canada Visa Job Search tool.

  • 20. What supporting documentation needs to be submitted once a candidate has been invited to apply for permanent residence?

    Candidates should bear in mind that the economic immigration programs that have been in place in recent years remain in place under the Express Entry selection system. Once an invitation to apply for permanent residence has been issued to a candidate, he or she must submit a range of supporting document with his or her application, as was the case previously. These documents include those pertaining to civil status such as marriage certificates (if applicable), birth certificates, language test results, an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA; if applicable), work reference letters, security background checks, and other documents.

  • 21. Are candidates required to get an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA)?

    An ECA is required for candidates in the Express Entry pool who wish to be considered for draws related to the Federal Skilled Worker Program, unless they received their post-secondary education in Canada. For candidates who are hoping to apply to the Federal Skilled Trades Program or Canadian Experience Class, an ECA is optional but may increase the points they receive on the Comprehensive Ranking System and improve their chances of being drawn from the pool.

  • 22. Do candidates need to take language tests?

    Yes, all candidates need to take a language test in order to determine their language abilities. There are a set number of points available for language ability for each of the economic immigration programs that come under Express Entry, and ability must be proven by candidates taking a standardized language test approved by Citizenship and Immigration Canada. The most popular are IELTS for English and TEF for French. As part of their Express Entry profile, candidates must submit valid language test results. Once a candidate enters the Express Entry pool, he or she can earn extra points and increase his or her rank by sitting another language test and obtaining better results. Candidates can practice IELTS before taking the test.

  • 23. Will candidates know their points total and rank in the Express Entry pool?

    Candidate will know their points total (or score), but will not know their rank within the pool. They will, however, know the minimum point’s total that was required for the most recent draw from the Express Entry pool. Therefore, they will have a target that they can aim to meet and surpass in order to increase their chances of being invited to apply for permanent residence.

  • 24. How long does a candidate’s profile remain in the Express Entry pool for?

    Each profile will remain in the Express Entry pool for a period of 12 months or until an invitation to apply for permanent residence is issued, whichever comes first. If after 12 months a candidate wishes to remain in the pool, he or she may create a fresh profile.

  • 25. If a candidate is invited to apply for permanent residence by a Canadian province or territory, is that candidate obliged to move to that particular province or territory?

    Candidates who receive an invitation to apply for permanent residence from a Canadian province or territory should have the intention to reside in that particular province or territory. The Provincial Nominee Programs (PNP) are set up to address local and regional labour market needs, and so it follows that candidates invited to apply through a PNP are deemed likely to succeed in that particular province or territory. Once a candidate has landed in Canada, however, he or she will have the right to freedom of movement within Canada, as well as the right to live and work anywhere in Canada for any employer.

  • 26. Can a candidate apply directly to a province under a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP)?

    Yes, a portion of the PNPs will be inside Express Entry, with the remainder operating external to Express Entry. If a candidate is eligible for a particular PNP and that PNP is receiving applications for assessment at the time, he or she may make an application to that particular province under the PNP without having to create an Express Entry profile. The Canada Visa immigration assessment form assesses your eligibility for immigration across more than 60 immigration programs, including the various PNPs.

  • 27. Once an applicant has submitted an application after being invited to apply for permanent residence, how long will the entire process take?

    Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) aims to process the majority of complete applications received within six months from the date of submission.

  • 28. What happens if an applicant is not invited to apply for permanent residence, but wishes to remain in the Express Entry pool?

    If after 12 months a candidate has not received an invitation to apply for permanent residence from the federal government, a Canadian province, or a Canadian employer but wishes to remain in the Express Entry pool, he or she can create a new Express Entry profile. If he or she is still eligible for one of the economic immigration programs, he or she will re-enter the Express Entry pool.

  • 29. What happens to candidates who have a birthday after they receive an invitation to apply but before they submit their application for permanent residence?

    An applicant may have a birthday after he or she receives an invitation to apply but before he or she submits an application for permanent residence. A change in age may lower his or her CRS score below the lowest score in the draw. It may also result in the applicant no longer meeting the minimum requirements. When a change in age results in the candidate no longer meeting the minimum entry criteria or lowering his or her CRS points score below the lowest points score in the draw, CIC officers are asked to apply the Public policy to exempt applicants for permanent residence from certain age-based requirements between invitation to apply and application. This public policy also grants an exemption to applicants who may be refused on FSW program requirements for having a birthday between receiving an invitation to apply and submitting an application. In short, a candidate's age may be considered locked in once an invitation to apply has been issued.

  • 30. Are candidates required to hire an immigration representative under Express Entry?

    Candidates are not required to hire an immigration representative in order to participate in Express Entry. Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) has determined, however, that authorized immigration representatives may assist candidates during all stages of the Express Entry immigration process. With over 35 years of success, lawyer David Cohen and his professional team at Campbell Cohen can help candidates immigrate to Canada by: Helping to prepare an accurate application going into the pool, lessening the risk of misrepresentation and the associated penalties. • Providing job alerts related to the candidate’s occupation and promoting the candidate to Canadian employers. This increases his or her chances of landing a skilled job and being invited to apply for permanent residency. •          Reviewing all supporting documents, submitting an application within the time frame set by the Government of Canada, and tracking it all the way while communicating with the government on the candidate’s behalf. Potential candidates can fill out an assessment form today and maximize their chances of success in immigrating to Canada under the Express Entry immigration selection system.

  • 3.Provincial Nomination Program FAQ
  • 1. What is the Provincial Nomination Program?

    The Provincial Nomination Program was established by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to allow Canada's different provinces and territories to select individuals who indicate an interest in settling in a particular province/territory and who will be able to contribute to that province/territories' economic development.

    Most, but not all, provinces and territories of Canada participate in the Provincial Nomination Program.

  • 2. is Provincial Nomination a requirement for Canada immigration?

    No. You can obtain a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa without Provincial Nomination.

  • 3. What is the advantage of obtaining Provincial Nomination?

    A Provincial Nomination means that your application for a Canada Immigration Visa will be processed quickly and it provides another way of qualifying for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa apart from the Federal Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration.

  • 4. Where and when does an application under the Provincial Nomination Program get submitted?

    An application under the Provincial Nomination Program is submitted to the appropriate provincial government office, before submitting an application for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa.

  • 5. Does receiving a Provincial Nomination guarantee a Canada Immigration Visa?

    No. Citizenship and Immigration Canada must be satisfied that a Provincial Nominee meets statutory requirements - health, security and authenticity of documents - before issuing a Canada Immigration Visa.

  • 6. What criteria do most provinces look for in their Nominees?

    Most provinces are looking for individuals who will contribute to the province's economic growth, and are willing to settle in that province.  Criteria that provinces take into consideration may include the following:

    Job offer in the province

    Education

    Work experience in critical industries

    English and/or French Language skills

    Close relations in that province

    Ability to adapt to life in that province

  • 7. Which Provinces participate in the Provincial Nomination Program?

    The following provinces participate in the Provincial Nomination Program:

    1. Alberta
    2. British Columbia
    3. Manitoba
    4. New Brunswick
    5. Newfoundland and Labrador
    6. Northwest Territories
    7. Nova Scotia
    8. Ontario
    9. Prince Edward Island
    10. Saskatchewan
    11. Yukon
  • 4.Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program?

    The Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP), previously named the Alberta Provincial Nomination Program, is a process in which the Province of Alberta nominates candidates to immigrate and settle in the province. It is administered by the Ministry of Employment and Immigration on behalf of the Government of Alberta.

  • 2. How does the Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program work?

    The AINP system consists of three main immigration streams, two of which are broken into their own sub-categories:

    Strategic Recruitment Stream

    -Compulsory and Optional Trades Category

    -Engineering Occupations Category

    -Post Graduate Worker Category

    Employer-Driven Stream

    -Skilled Worker Category

    -International Graduate Category

    -Semi-skilled Worker Category

    Self-Employed Farmer Stream

  • 3. What is the Employer-Driven Stream?

    This stream is a process in which employers from Alberta can nominate the workers they need from outside Canada if they have been unable to fill vacant permanent positions with Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents. If an employer has extended a permanent job offer to a candidate, and the candidate has accepted the job offer, they can apply for a Provincial Nomination Certificate.

    The stream consists of three main immigration categories:

    The first is the Skilled Worker Category, in which the position to be filled is a skilled occupation that falls under the “0” skill type or “A,” or “B” skill levels in the National Occupation Classification.

    The second is the International Graduate Category, in which an employer is filling a position (in the “A,” “0” or “B” skilled levels) with a foreign student who has completed post-secondary education at a publicly funded institution in Canada.

    The third category is the Semi-Skilled Worker Category, in which the position to be filled is a specific industry but does not fall under the “0,” “A,” or “B” skill levels, but rather under the “C” or “D” skill levels.

  • 4. What is the Strategic Recruitment Stream?

    This stream is a process in which the province of Alberta nominates people to become permanent workers in Alberta according to the province’s needs. However, a job offer from an Alberta employer is not required. There are three categories in the Strategic Recruitment Stream:

    Compulsory and Optional Trades Category

    Engineering Occupations Category; and

    Post Graduate Worker Category.

  • 5.British Columbia Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program?

    The British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) is a process that allows the province of British Columbia to nominate immigrants to fill the economic and Labour market needs of the province.

  • 2. How does the British Columbia PNP work?

    The BC PNP system accepts applicants under two main immigration categories:

    Skills Immigration; and

    Business Immigration.

  • 3. What is the Skills Immigration Stream?

    This stream is for workers who have received an offer of full-time employment from an employer in British Columbia. It is further broken down into five sub-categories:

    • Skilled Worker Category
    • Health Care Professional Category
    • International Graduates, B.C. Degree Category
    • International Graduates, Canadian Degree Category
    • Entry Level and Semi-Skilled Worker Category; and
    • Northeast Pilot Project Category.
  • 4. Who is considered a skilled worker under the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program?

    To be considered a skilled worker under the British Columbia PNP, an applicant must have a job offer in an eligible occupation in levels 0, A, and B of Canada’s National Occupation Classification Matrix (NOC).

  • 5. What is the Northeast Pilot Project Category?

    This program was created under the Skills Immigration Stream for individuals living and working in the Northeast Development Region of British Columbia. Applicants to the program do not need a job offer in Canada. Additionally, individuals who are considered semi-skilled and unskilled may still be eligible to apply.

  • 6. Who is considered a health care professional under the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program?

    Physicians, registered nurses and psychiatric nurses, and midwives are considered health care professionals under the British Columbia PNP.

  • 7. What is the Business Immigration Stream?

    This stream is for individuals who intend to settle and invest in British Columbia. The stream is further broken down into three sub-categories:

    • Entrepreneur Category
    • Regional Entrepreneur Category
    • Strategic Projects Category; and
    • Regional Business Succession Option.
  • 6.Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program?

    The Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP) is a program that allows the province of Manitoba to nominate potential immigrants according to the needs of the province.

  • 2. How does the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program work?

    The MB PNP consists of three main immigration streams:

    Manitoba Invitation

    Manitoba Connection; and

    Business Investor.

  • 3. What is the Manitoba Invitation stream?

    MPNP officials use the Manitoba Invitation stream to invite eligible individuals to apply for permanent residency. Provincial officials make regular trips abroad to search for prospective immigrants under this stream.

  • 4. What is the Manitoba Connection stream?

    This stream facilitates immigration for individuals who have a connection to Manitoba. This connection may be related to work or education experience in Manitoba, or a family member or close friend residing in the province.

  • 5. What is the Business Investor stream?

    This stream is for individuals interested in living and investing in Manitoba. The program operates on an ‘Expression of Interest’ system, whereby prospective applicants submit their intention to apply to the program, and the most qualified applicants are invited to apply for immigration.

  • 7.New Brunswick Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program?

    The New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) is a program that allows the province of New Brunswick to nominate immigrants to fill the economic and labour market needs of the province.

  • 2. How does the New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program work?

    The New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) accepts applications under three immigrations categories:

    • Business Immigration
    • Skilled Workers with Employer Support; and
    • Skilled Workers with Family Support.
  • 3. What is the Business Immigration category?

    This category is for applicants who intend to establish a business in New Brunswick and settle there permanently. Applicants must submit a preliminary business plan to the Population Growth Secretariat of New Brunswick.

  • 4. Apart from an approved business plan, what other criteria must Business Applicants fulfil?

    In addition to having their business plans approved, applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

    • Be between the ages of 22 and 55
    • Hold at least a High School Diploma
    • Demonstrate an intention to live and operate in New Brunswick
    • Show relevant and proven management experience in 3 of the last 5 years
    • Demonstrate sufficient English and/or French language ability to actively manage a business in New Brunswick
    • Have a personal net worth of at least $300,000 CAD
    • Score 50 points on a selection grid
    • Make at least one business trip to New Brunswick

    -The trip must be at least five full business days, during which time extensive research on business practices should be done

    Following the interview, the applicant must meet with a NB PNP official

  • 5. What is the Family Support category?

    This category targets individuals who have worked in New Brunswick and have close family ties in the province. A family member must sponsor the skilled worker applicant. Family Supporters must meet the following criteria:

     

    • Be a close relative of the applicant
    • A non-dependent child, brother, sister, niece, nephew, or grandchild of the Family Supporter, or their spouse or common-law partner, may be sponsored through this category.
    • Be a Canadian citizen or Permanent Resident, and reside full-time in New Brunswick
    • Be financially self-supporting
    • Participate in an interview with an official from the Population Growth Division
    • Assist the applicant with a settlement plan
    • Support only one applicant at a time
  • 6. How do I qualify for the Family Support category?

    Eligible applicants to this category must meet the following criteria:

    • Be between 22 and 50 years of age
    • Be a close relative of the Family Supporter
    • Have sufficient English or French ability to settle in New Brunswick and fulfil their job duties in their intended occupation

    -Applicant must provide scores from an approved English or French test

    • Have the education, qualifications, and/or license/certification needed to perform job duties in their intended occupation
    • Demonstrate an intent to live and work in New Brunswick
    • Have at least two years of continuous, full-time work experience in their intended occupation in New Brunswick, within the last five years
    • Have the funds to settle in New Brunswick

    -A minimum of $10,000 CAD, and an additional $2000 for each accompanying family member

  • 8.Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program?

    The NL PNP is Newfoundland and Labrador’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nomination Certificate, which will allow that foreign national to apply for Canadian Permanent Residency with processing times that are faster than other Canadian immigration classes.

  • 2. How does the Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program work?

    The NL PNP accepts applications under three immigration categories:

    • Skilled Worker Category
    • International Graduate Category; and
    • Immigrant Entrepreneur Category.
  • 3. How does the International Graduate Category work?

    The province accepts applications under this category from recent graduates of an eligible Canadian post-secondary institution who remain in Canada on a Post-Graduate Work Permit. Applicants must also have either a current job or valid job offer from a Newfoundland and Labrador employer.

  • 4. Who qualifies as an Immigrant Entrepreneur under this category?

    The province accepts applications under this category from individuals who plan to either start a business or purchase an existing business in the province. Note: at the time of publication, this category is currently under review and is not yet accepting applications.

  • 5. Who qualifies as a Skilled Worker under this category?

    The program accepts applicants who have a full-time job offer from a Newfoundland and Labrador employer. Applicants must have the qualifications, training, and skills needed for their occupation. Additionally, applicants must demonstrate their ability to settle permanently in Newfoundland and Labrador. All applicants must also speak sufficient English or French, meeting the Minimum Language Requirements.

  • 9.Nova Scotia Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the Nova Scotia Nominee Program?

    The Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP) is a program that allows the province of Nova Scotia to nominate immigrants to fill the economic and labour market needs of the province.

  • 2. How does the Nova Scotia Nominee Program work?

    The Nova Scotia Nominee program (NSNP) accepts applications under three different immigration streams:

    • Regional Labour Market Demand Stream
    • Skilled Worker Stream; and
    • Family Business Worker.
  • 3. What is the Regional Labour Market Demand Stream?

    This stream accepts individuals who possess skills and experience that are in demand in Nova Scotia. While a job offer is not required to apply under this stream, applicants must have experience in at least one of 43 targeted occupations. Note: This stream is currently closed, and will reopen on January 1st/2015.

  • 4. How do I qualify as a Family Business Worker?

    In order to be eligible to apply under this program, the identified worker, or their spouse, must be related to the family business owner or the spouse of the business owner in one of the following ways:

    • Son or daughter
    • Brother or sister
    • Niece or nephew
    • Uncle or aunt; or

    They may also be a step or half relative of the same degree.

     

    Additionally, applicants must meet the following criteria:

    • Have legal status in their country of residence
    • Have a permanent, full time job offer from a Nova Scotia business belonging to a family member
    • Have the necessary education, training, qualifications or licensing/accreditation needed to perform the job
    • Have the appropriate work experience needed for the position
    • Demonstrate the intent and ability to settle in the province of Nova Scotia

     

    Additionally, the family business owner, or their spouse, must meet the following criteria:

    • Be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident
    • Lived in Nova Scotia for at least two years
    • Own at least 33.3% of the business offering the job offer

    -Business should be under current management for at least two years

     

    Have a financially viable business that can provide the salary and other parameters outlined in the job offer

    Not received social assistance or employment assistance in the last two years

    Issue a full-time, permanent job offer to the close family member that meets the following requirements:

    -Employer has salary, benefit, and working condition standards that meet the provincial employment standards

    -Employer does not contravene bargaining agreements or settle any labour disputes

    The family business owner or their spouse/common-law partner may support an application under this category no more than once every two years. They may have to provide documentation to prove that previously supported family members have settled into Nova Scotia, found employment, and have not needed social assistance

  • 5. What is the Skilled Worker Stream?

    This stream is for applicants with a permanent, full-time job offer from a Nova Scotia employer who can demonstrate that they have made an effort to fill the position with a Canadian citizen or Permanent Resident before extending the offer of employment to the applicant. The stream is composed of three different categories:

    • Skilled Workers
    • Semi-Skilled Workers; and
    • Low-Skilled Workers.
  • 6. How do I qualify as a Skilled Worker under the NSNP?

    To qualify under this category, applicants must have experience in an occupation classified as NOC level 0, A or B, also known as skilled occupations. Priority is given to these high skilled applicants.

  • 10.Opportunities Ontario - Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the Opportunities Ontario Provincial Nominee Program?

    Opportunities Ontario is a program under which prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive an Ontario Provincial Nomination Certificate, which will allow that foreign national to apply for Canadian Permanent Residence with processing times that are faster than other Canadian immigration classes.

  • 2. How does the Opportunities Ontario Provincial Nominee Program work?

    The Opportunities Ontario Provincial Nominee Program accepts applications under three different immigration categories:

    • General Category
    • International Students Category; and
    • Investors Category.
  • 3. How do I qualify as an International Student?

    This category accepts applications under the following sub-categories:

    International Students with a Job Offer Stream: This program open to Ontario employers and students with a job offer in the province

    International PhD Graduate Stream: This program targets individuals who have graduated from a PhD program at one of Ontario’s publicly funded universities – a job offer is not required

    Pilot International Masters Graduate Stream: This program targets individuals who have graduated with a Master’s degree from one of Ontario’s publicly funded universities – a job offer is not required.

  • 4. How do I qualify as an Investor?

    Applicant companies to the Investment program must make an investment in Ontario exceeding $3,000,000 CAD. The investment must create at least five jobs in the province of Ontario. For individuals applying to the program, an investment of at least $1,000,000 is required, as well as a 33.3% control stake in the company and involvement in the day-to-day business.

  • 5. What is the Hospitality Sector Pilot Project

    This program was created for individuals who are currently working in Saskatchewan as food and beverage servers, food counter attendants, kitchen helpers, or housekeeping and cleaning staff for at least six months. The employer must receive approval from the Province of Saskatchewan before the applicant begins work in Canada.

  • 11.Prince Edward Island Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the Prince Edward Island Provincial Nominee Program?

    The Prince Edward Island Provincial Nominee Program (PEI PNP) is a program that allows the province of Prince Edward Island to nominate immigrants to fill the economic and labour market needs of the province.

  • 2. How does the Prince Edward Island Provincial Nominee Program work?

    The Prince Edward Island Provincial Nominee Program accepts applications under two major immigration categories:

    • Business Impact Category
    • Labour Impact Category
  • 3. How does the Business Impact Category work?

    The province accepts applicants under this category from individuals who wish to invest in and actively manage a business in PEI. The category is broken into three streams:

    • 100% Ownership Stream
    • Partial Ownership Stream
    • Work Permit Stream
  • 4. How does the Labour Impact Category work?

    The province accepts applicants under this category from individuals who possess skills and experience that are needed in PEI’s labour market. The category is divided into two sub-categories:

    • Skilled Worker Stream
    • Critical Worker Stream
  • 5. Who qualifies as a Critical Worker under this category?

    This category is for workers who have already been hired by a PEI employer, and whose employer would like to sponsor them for permanent residency. Eligible applicants can work in a semi-skilled or unskilled profession.

  • 12.Saskatchewan Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the Saskatchewan Provincial Nominee Program?

    The Saskatchewan Provincial Nominee Program (SINP) is a program that allows the province of Saskatchewan to nominate immigrants to fill the economic and labour market needs of the province.

  • 2. How does the Saskatchewan Provincial Nominee Program work?

    The Saskatchewan Provincial Nominee Program (SINP) accepts applications under three immigration categories:

    • International Skilled Worker Category
    • Saskatchewan Experience Category; and
    • Entrepreneur and Farm Category.
  • 3. How do I qualify as a Skilled Worker under the Saskatchewan Provincial Nominee Program?

    To qualify as a skilled worker under the SINP, you must have a permanent, full-time job offer from a Saskatchewan employer as a worker in a skilled, professional, or managerial position OR have worked previously for an approved Saskatchewan Employer for at least one year full-time on a Temporary Work Permit.

  • 4. What is the Saskatchewan Experience Category?

    This category is for foreign workers that are currently living in Saskatchewan. The Saskatchewan Experience category accepts applications under the following different sub-categories:

    • Existing Work Permit Sub-Category
    • Health Professionals Sub-Category
    • Hospitality Sector Pilot Project
    • Long Haul Truck Drivers Sub-Category; and
    • Students Sub-Category.
  • 5. How do I qualify as a Student under the Students Sub-Category?

    The Students Sub-Category accepts applications from students who have graduated from a recognized post-secondary institution in Canada. Among the requirements, student applicants must have twenty-four months of full-time work experience in Canada, or six months if their post-secondary education institution is in Saskatchewan.

  • 13.Yukon Nomination Program (PNP) FAQ
  • 1. What is the Yukon Nominee Program?

    The YNP is the Yukon’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the territory may receive a Yukon Provincial Nomination Certificate, which will allow that foreign national to apply for Canadian permanent residency with processing times that are faster than other Canadian immigration classes.

  • 2. How does the Yukon Nominee Program work?

    The YNP accepts applications under three main immigration programs:

    • Skilled Worker Program
    • Critical Impact Worker Program; and
    • Business Nominee Program.
  • 3. Who qualifies under the Business Nominee Program?

    Applicants to this program must meet the following criteria:

    • Have a minimum of five years senior management or entrepreneurial experience in a business similar to the one proposed in the Yukon
    • Have a minimum net worth of $250,000, with minimum liquid assets of $150,000
    • Have visited the Yukon at least once, and possess an understanding of the territory’s business environment.

    -During the visit, the applicant must meet with a YNP program officer in the Business and Industry Development Branch; and

    Demonstrate English or French skills that are sufficient to operate a business in the Yukon.

  • 4. What is the Critical Impact Worker Program?

    This program was created to help employers sponsor individuals for immigration who have skilled work experience that is in high demand in the territory. Sponsored applicants must receive a job offer from a Yukon employer; however they are not required to be in the Yukon at the time of the application.